Moulding

Introduction

The term "moulding" simply denotes contours that embellish a surface. Such contours produce variation in the value (lightness/darkness) of a surface given the shadows they cast. Moulding can be reduced to seven basic types.

The Seven Basic Types of Moulding
static transitional
flat projecting fillet
fillet
bevel
bevel
receding channel
channel
curved projecting bead
bead
quarter-round
quarter-round
receding flute
flute
cove
cove

Static mouldings, which begin and end on the same plane, can serve either to divide a surface (when used individually) or to provide a texture (when used repetitively). Transitional mouldings, on the other hand, terminate on a higher or lower plane than they begin. A series of transitional mouldings can be stacked to form a projecting or receding profile, as in base moulding (which widens downward) or crown moulding (which widens upward).

The overall aesthetic effect of moulding depends on the distribution of convex and concave elements. Convexity is strong and supportive, while concavity is delicate and refined.

Crown Moulding

Flat Mouldings

Fillets and channels are often found in isolation. Small fillets are sometimes used to accentuate larger mouldings.
Accent Fillets

Curved Mouldings

A bead is often applied on its own, with a similar effect to that of a lone fillet. (A thick bead that encircles the base of a column is called a torus.) A flute may also be used singularly like a channel, or applied repetitively as fluting.

Fluting

The quarter-round and cove are the building blocks of crown and base moulding, though they may also be used alone for simple transitions, as may the bevel.